Report calls for policy reforms to achieve planetary and human health

This new report “Planetary Health: Safeguarding Human Health in the Anthropocene Epoch” launched by The Rockefeller Foundation - Lancet Commission argues that changing environmental conditions such as increased carbon dioxide emissions, rampant use of fertilizer and the acidification of the oceans could lead to major health challenges for millions of people. Increasing population, unsustainable consumption and production and the over-exploitation of natural resources are also factors straining the planet's resources and having an impact on human health. 

The Rockefeller Foundation and The Lancet joined forces in 2014 to form the Commission on Planetary Health and to review the scientific basis for linking human health to the underlying integrity of Earth's natural system.   

Fifteen commissioners from eight countries were involved in the development of the report.

Abstract/report introduction

“Over the last few decades, global health has emerged as a powerful new discipline for addressing critical health challenges. Despite recent health gains, there is growing evidence that the planet’s capacity to sustain the growing human population is declining. The degradation of our air, water, and land, has resulted in a significant loss in biodiversity. As a result, disease patterns are changing and new diseases are emerging.

Now is the time for a new discipline.

“Planetary health” that incorporates the interdependencies of human and natural systems, while also recognizing preserving the integrity of natural systems is an essential precondition for human health, survival, and prosperity.”

See the full report here and further coverage by United Nations development Programme (UNEP) here.

For more links between environment/climatic change and human health see the research library categories on global health, climate change impacts and adaptation as well as climate change: mitigation and a general search  on planetary boundaries.

Publication
09 Nov 2015
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